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      02-17-2016, 08:27 AM   #1
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Any Skiers here?

Just got into skiing again after 15 years.

I would say my skill level definitely progressed from beginner to intermediate.

Before I would usually rent equipment, but now I'm looking into purchasing my own.

I would like some advice on what boots and skis (in terms of quality and performance) I should be looking at mainly for downhill skiing.

Thanks.

Last edited by Wolf 335; 02-17-2016 at 08:38 AM..
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      02-17-2016, 08:44 AM   #2
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When I used to ski, I had Salomon gear. But then I got into snowboarding and haven't looked back since! Good luck!
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      02-17-2016, 08:49 AM   #3
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When I used to ski, I had Salomon gear. But then I got into snowboarding and haven't looked back since! Good luck!
Why do you prefer snowboarding over skiing?
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      02-17-2016, 08:51 AM   #4
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Yes, here => http://www.m3post.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1208090
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      02-17-2016, 08:59 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolf 335 View Post
Just got into skiing again after 15 years.

I would say my skill level definitely progressed from beginner to intermediate.

Before I would usually rent equipment, but now I'm looking into purchasing my own.

I would like some advice on what boots and skis (in terms of quality and performance) I should be looking at mainly for downhill skiing.

Thanks.
Go to an ski area that has a demo rental program that allows you to change gear during the day. This way you get to try out different boots, ski types, and ski lengths. The equipment makes a huge difference in both comfort and ability. Once you find what you like, go buy it and enjoy. Sometimes if its close to end of season the rental place will sell you what you are renting on the spot.

Have fun.
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      02-17-2016, 09:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolf 335 View Post
Why do you prefer snowboarding over skiing?
It's more comfortable, convenient, and fun IMO
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      02-17-2016, 02:31 PM   #7
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yup +1 on the demo program at a ski resort. Also depending on the conditions that you are skiing in, for example, east coast vs west coast in the United States... East coast tends to be more ice/slush whereas the west coast is more powder... Demo first, ask for some advice, and take it from there... i bought a set 10 years ago (K2 Apaches) and I have zero regrets. Get a good quality ski and take care of them and the set will last
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      02-17-2016, 02:39 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meehowhow View Post
When I used to ski, I had Salomon gear. But then I got into snowboarding and haven't looked back since! Good luck!
Same here, once I started snowboarding, I've never gone back to skiing
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      02-17-2016, 03:05 PM   #9
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Same here, once I started snowboarding, I've never gone back to skiing
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      02-17-2016, 03:17 PM   #10
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All the gear depends on what kind of skiing you like to do and where you like to ski. If you ski in the west you will probably want a ski that is a bit wider underfoot due to the softer snow and the fact it snows often. The downfall of a wider ski is they are a little harder to get on an edge if the snow is hard pack.

If you ski on the east coast you will probably want a narrow ski under foot making it easier to get on edge. Since it doesn't snow as much or as often this just makes it easier.

For boots if your not a very advanced skier get something that is a softer flex.

Last edited by Eliminator 429; 02-17-2016 at 05:28 PM..
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      02-17-2016, 03:47 PM   #11
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Bought a set of K2s this year and love them. Get something you are comfortable in and don't go overboard.
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      02-18-2016, 07:47 AM   #12
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Disclaimer: I am a snowboarder.

I have lived in ski resort town for the past 8 years and have learned a great deal about equipment in that time. IMHO the most important factor is your comfort, from your base layers all the way to your helmet and goggles. If you've been off of the slopes for a while, you'll be amazed at the advances in technology. But if you go for technology alone, then you'll probably sacrifice comfort. There's nothing worse than a pair of expensive boots giving you foot pain and making your day miserable. My wife is an accomplished skier and is currently going about preparing to acquire new boots. We have an advantage here, some of our friends are instructors and some are ski patrol. These folks are in their boots for at least 8 hours a day, and they prize comfort over everything else, so they provide great advice to us. Based on the latter, it's best to have boots custom fitted for your needs. I find that the boot fitters at the resorts are more geared to deal with tourists and tend to rush things, so ask around and engage with a reputable fitter. A good boot fitter can take several hours to fit you, well worth the investment of your time to get it right the first time. Now proceed to a store at the resorts, one that will allow you to test ski's and go from there. Oh, and did I mention socks, do not cheap out on your socks! Smartwool is a great brand and their socks will keep your feet comfy and warm. I hope that his helps you to make some progress in your quest, welcome back! Here is the store we now use for fittings: http://www.inklinefootscience.com/?page_id=11
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      02-18-2016, 09:33 AM   #13
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Some good recommendations on here. I appreciate everyone's suggestions.
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      02-18-2016, 12:29 PM   #14
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I snowboard as well. I skiied twice before I was even a teenager but didn't hit the slopes again until I started snowboarding well into my 20's. I got lucky - a bunch of my college friends were learning at the same time and some of them were really good who always tagged along and taught us correct techniques. It was however very difficult to learn to snowboard in my 20's. I tell people that if I was just a few years older, I probably would have given up. It was a painful 2-3 SEASONS learning to snowboard. Around the 3rd to 4th season, I wasn't falling at all. At the time I was infatuated with snowboarding. I remember going to the slopes 2-3 times a week just to learn the new sport. I honestly love snowboarding.

Fast forward 10 years to today and I'm just getting old lol. I'm actually getting a little bored with snowboarding and am trying new techniques, jumps, switch riding, etc. I've wanted to learn to ski for the past 2-3 seasons, but never pulled the trigger simply because I own 2 snowboards and all the gear.

Some advice I would give is to try to travel to different mountains around the world and ski on them. I didn't realize at the time, but east coast skiing is shit. It's literally learning to ski on ice. The mountains and snow in Whistler is different than California. The mountains and snow in Colorado is different than Pennsylvania. Snowboarding in bowls and on glaciers is quite different. If you stick to your one geograpic area, you'll never learn to traverse different types of terrain.

Also, for buying skis, look for demo specials on sale. They're often one or two seasons out, barely used, and can be bought for a great price (usually a couple hundred).

Last edited by catcher22; 02-18-2016 at 12:39 PM..
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      02-18-2016, 01:32 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catcher22 View Post
I snowboard as well. I skiied twice before I was even a teenager but didn't hit the slopes again until I started snowboarding well into my 20's. I got lucky - a bunch of my college friends were learning at the same time and some of them were really good who always tagged along and taught us correct techniques. It was however very difficult to learn to snowboard in my 20's. I tell people that if I was just a few years older, I probably would have given up. It was a painful 2-3 SEASONS learning to snowboard. Around the 3rd to 4th season, I wasn't falling at all. At the time I was infatuated with snowboarding. I remember going to the slopes 2-3 times a week just to learn the new sport. I honestly love snowboarding.

Fast forward 10 years to today and I'm just getting old lol. I'm actually getting a little bored with snowboarding and am trying new techniques, jumps, switch riding, etc. I've wanted to learn to ski for the past 2-3 seasons, but never pulled the trigger simply because I own 2 snowboards and all the gear.

Some advice I would give is to try to travel to different mountains around the world and ski on them. I didn't realize at the time, but east coast skiing is shit. It's literally learning to ski on ice. The mountains and snow in Whistler is different than California. The mountains and snow in Colorado is different than Pennsylvania. Snowboarding in bowls and on glaciers is quite different. If you stick to your one geograpic area, you'll never learn to traverse different types of terrain.

Also, for buying skis, look for demo specials on sale. They're often one or two seasons out, barely used, and can be bought for a great price (usually a couple hundred).
If you can ski on the East coast, you can ski anywhere. I grew up racing in Vermont but have skied in a few places (heli-skiing, glaciers during the summer, backcountry, etc) and have not encountered a terrain that has truly given me pause aside from admiration.

With regards to the skis themselves, its highly subjective and I wouldn't solicit the advice of random strangers online as far as specific skis (this also extends to boots and other equipment). What works well in one type of terrain may not work well elsewhere and your skiing style and ability plays a huge role.

For example, I currently have one main pair of skis that I use and they a basically a beer-league racing slalom ski. Super-stiff but I like the responsiveness and edge-holding they have and they fit the majority of the skiing I do here in Vermont which is mainly icy or hard-pack groomers with some moguls/glades mixed in. I have an aggressive style so making the effort to get those things to turn is fun and rewarding to me. An intermediate skier probably wouldn't like them because they are not forgiving and they would not be great in the soft, ungroomed stuff out west due to the narrow width. Also, different size skis of the same model will have different turn radii leading to a different feel. I demoed a pair of GS skis last week and in the 183 length they were fun for a little while but quite leaden underfoot but when I went to a 176 length they were more lively and well-suited to everyday skiing.

My point being is that there are many choices and if you happen to have a good shop near you they can point you in the general direction of some skis that would suit you. Demoing them is the way to go. My local shop does a demo day every year with 5 or so vendors and you can swap out a bunch of different skis to see what you like--I try at least 5 different ones every time they do it. Then, I wait until the end of the year and buy them on sale or buy some used demo skis for 50% off.

The rest of the gear I will buy on an as needed basis and buy the best available with the intention of keeping it for a long time. I ski a lot so its worthwhile. Since I already have everything its only a few items each year and everything is more or less top of the line and pretty minimal expenditure in the grand scheme of things. Consignment sales at ski shops or the mountain is a good way to get stocked up initially if you are starting from ground zero.

I could go on and on. The best thing is to have a shop you know and trust--especially for boots.

Edit: Forgot to add that lessons are invaluable and take as many as you can. Don't listen to your friends advice on technique unless they really know WTF they are doing and don't ski above your ability. With skiing (like with cars) peoples egos get involved and its nice to learn from someone who does it for a living rather than a person who might only ski 5 times a year and and has an inflated sense of their ability.

Last edited by kraeburn; 02-18-2016 at 01:44 PM..
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      02-18-2016, 01:39 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radiofrequency View Post
Disclaimer: I am a snowboarder.

I have lived in ski resort town for the past 8 years and have learned a great deal about equipment in that time. IMHO the most important factor is your comfort, from your base layers all the way to your helmet and goggles. If you've been off of the slopes for a while, you'll be amazed at the advances in technology. But if you go for technology alone, then you'll probably sacrifice comfort. There's nothing worse than a pair of expensive boots giving you foot pain and making your day miserable. My wife is an accomplished skier and is currently going about preparing to acquire new boots. We have an advantage here, some of our friends are instructors and some are ski patrol. These folks are in their boots for at least 8 hours a day, and they prize comfort over everything else, so they provide great advice to us. Based on the latter, it's best to have boots custom fitted for your needs. I find that the boot fitters at the resorts are more geared to deal with tourists and tend to rush things, so ask around and engage with a reputable fitter. A good boot fitter can take several hours to fit you, well worth the investment of your time to get it right the first time. Now proceed to a store at the resorts, one that will allow you to test ski's and go from there. Oh, and did I mention socks, do not cheap out on your socks! Smartwool is a great brand and their socks will keep your feet comfy and warm. I hope that his helps you to make some progress in your quest, welcome back! Here is the store we now use for fittings: http://www.inklinefootscience.com/?page_id=11
Despite being a snowboarder you are spot-on about boots. They are the most important part of the system. I spend more money on boots than skis. Boot fitting is EVERYTHING.

As for socks, its a bit different than snowboarding probably. Smartwool is good but I would add that you want the thinnest socks you can get. Counter to logic, your feet will be warmer and more comfortable. I don't think it would be as critical in a snowboarding boot.
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      02-19-2016, 02:02 PM   #17
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I'm an avid skier, and will echo what radiofrequency says - the most important piece of a equipment is definitely your boots. The foot is very complex, and not all boots work with every foot. Seek out an experienced boot fitter, but make sure they're easily accessible. You're likely not going to get a perfect fit after one appointment - it's just the reality of the matter. It took me three trips to get them perfect for me. Some of the resorts do have some solid boot fitters (at least out here in CO), so don't discount them as a resource. Plus, it's nice to have adjustments after your day on the mountain so you can easily identify the issue.

Also, consider getting custom footbeds, or at least upgrade the flimsy footbed in the boot to a Superfeet product.

Fischer came out with their vacuum line of boots a few years ago, which supposedly took some of the guesswork out of fitting, and from what I can tell, has been fairly well received. The vacuum line had just come out when I got my boots, so I wasn't ready to be the guinea pig for it, but I'd consider it now.

I know a couple people that have gone to Surefoot for their boots and are happy with their experience. They are a chain, however, so you may not get the same quality service/knowledge from store to store/fitter to fitter. They are also more expensive overall, and you'll already be spending quite a bit on a good set of boots. Expect to pay at least $500for a good pair. Right now is a great time to buy though since stores just started their clearance for the season.

As for skis, it really depends on where you ski, your ability/level and preferred terrain. My everyday ski out here wouldn't really be suitable for the east coast, nor would it be suitable for someone wanting to rail groomers or hang out in the terrain park all day. Your local ski shop should be able to give you some good recommendations though. Be careful though, skiing can be just as addictive to modding cars, and before you know it, you'll own four pair of skis!

Cheers and have fun!

Last edited by thaar; 02-19-2016 at 03:23 PM..
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      02-19-2016, 02:14 PM   #18
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Not sure where in GTA you are, but there appears to be a good shop in Mississauga, near the 427 and QEW. Might want to stop in there to chat with them. Chris Van apparently is the person to ask for.

http://www.skiisandbiikes.com/services/ (scroll down about 2/3 where they talk about boot fitting)

http://gifts.skiisandbiikes.com/bootfitting
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      02-19-2016, 03:14 PM   #19
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IMO if your going to have a one ski in your quiver, K2 Apache is it. They were recommended to me about 8 years ago and its still the only ski I bring with me under any conditions.

As far as boots, these are actually more important than the skis, about 5 years ago I got custom fitted, injection molded boots with built in heating elements as my feet get cold on slopes and makes skiing not fun when that happens. I did a lot of research and ended up going with Surefoot and highly recommend them.

But as one previous poster said, do a demo rental package the next time you go skiing, you can change your skis on every run sometimes 2 x per run if they have a chalet at the top or midway.

Good luck
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      11-28-2016, 10:15 AM   #20
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I have skiied for many years and got bored with it. I tried snowboarding but got fed up with falling over all the time. So then I graduated to ski de randonnee (climbing with skins) and then to the ultimate adrenaline trip - speed-riding. The two latter make a nice combination: 4 hours up, 3 minutes down...
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      11-28-2016, 10:18 AM   #21
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Best places for me: Telluride, Steamboat, Copper Mountain, Heavenly. Also.....no shame in buying used ski stuff, just never buy used gloves.
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      11-28-2016, 12:12 PM   #22
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I'm assuming almost everyone who skis more than 10 days a season purchase a season pass? Something like Epic? I think lift ticket, is probably the single biggest expense once you have your equipment. Any tips on saving for lift tickets?
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